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  • Recently added to e-stock: Routledge ebooks May to September 2017

    Yours truly regularly gets invited to recommend Routledge ebook titles, as do other Faculty and Department librarians. The latest batch (May to September 2017), includes the following titles, which might be of interest to members of the Faculty of Divininity.

    Cover of 9780415662611

    Marriage, Gender and Islam in Indonesia

    Women Negotiating Informal Marriage, Divorce and Desire, by Maria Platt

    Edition 1st Edition Published 17 May 2017 Pub. location London Imprint Routledge Pages 172 pages eBook ISBN 9781351714877

     

     

    Cover of 9781138646049

    Islam and International Relations

    Fractured Worlds, by Mustapha Kamal Pasha

    Edition 1st Edition Published 9 May 2017 Pub. location London Imprint Routledge Pages 198 pages eBook ISBN 9781317239079

     

     

    Cover of 9781317612414

    Human Rights, Islam and the Failureof Cosmopolitanismb, by June Edmunds

    Edition 1st Edition Published 18 May 2017 Pub. location London Imprint Routledge Pages 180 pages eBook ISBN 9781351579261

     

     

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    Punk Rock is My Religion

    Straight Edge Punk and ‘Religious’ Identity, by Francis Stewart

    Edition 1st Edition Published 1 June 2017 Pub. location London Imprint Routledge Pages 188 pages eBook ISBN 9781351725569

     

     

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    The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, by Sebastian Guzman, James Hill

    Edition 1st Edition Published 3 July 2017 Pub. location London Imprint Macat Library Pages 91 pages eBook ISBN 9781351351546

     

     

    Cover of 9781138054158

    Young Muslim Change-Makers

    Grassroots Charities Rethinking Modern Societies, by William Barylo

    Edition 1st Edition Published 27 July 2017 Pub. location London Imprint Routledge Pages 162 pages eBook ISBN 9781351681650

     

     

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    Islamic Philosophy and Theology, by W. Montgomery Watt

    Edition 1st Edition Published 30 September 2008 Pub. location New York Imprint Routledge Pages 219 pages eBook ISBN 9781351511421

     

     

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    The Persian Sufis, by Cyprian Rice

    Edition 1st Edition Published 19 July 2017 Pub. location London Imprint Routledge Pages 108 pages eBook ISBN 9781351625265

     

     

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    Anthropology and Ethics, by Mary Edel & Abraham Edel

    Edition 1st Edition Published 30 September 2000 Pub. location New York Imprint Routledge Pages 280 pages eBook ISBN 9781351531580

     

     

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    The Muslim Brotherhood in Syria

    The Democratic Option of Islamism, by Naomí Ramírez Díaz

    Edition 1st Edition Published 4 September 2017 Pub. location London Imprint Routledge Pages 184 pages eBook ISBN 9781351789486

     

     

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    Arabs and Iranians in the Islamic Conquest Narrative

    Memory and Identity Construction in Islamic Historiography, 750–1050, by Scott Savran

    Edition 1st Edition Published 14 September 2017 Pub. location London Imprint Routledge Pages 258 pages eBook ISBN 9781317749097

     

     

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    Religion, Violence, and the Secular State, by John C. Caiazza

    Edition 1st Edition Published 7 September 2017 Pub. location New York Imprint Routledge Pages 156 pages eBook ISBN 9781351588751

     

     

    I should probably add, that most of the time only a book recommended by more than 1 subject librarian, gets purchased… so by nature the above books are interdisciplinary. There are a fair number of books relating to Islam above. This is due to the fact that I recommend them, and that another librarian who is looking after politics, sociology, Middle Eastern studies, or Southeast Asian studies, also recommends such titles (due to their “secondary” subject, or fitting into the geographical area of their subject). Also, of course, Routledge are not known for having a particular strength in publishing a lot of books on Christian theology or Biblical Studies. This might sound like me excusing the above selection – but nothing could further from the truth. As a good proportion of the Faculty of Divinity’s teaching and research is not about Christian theology, the above ebooks nicely complement the print holdings of the Divinity Library. CG

  • Johann Joachim Winckelmann (1717-1768)

    This December marks the 300th anniversary of the birth of Johann Joachim Winckelmann, one of the most important scholars of his age. He was the founder of modern art history and archaeology and a pioneer of German classicism. Winckelmann, who … Continue reading →
  • What did Voyager do for us?

    In January librarians across Cambridge will be using a different Library Management System. Voyager has been a (generally!) faithful servant for the last 13 years, and it’s time to move on to a new system that’s better able to cope … Continue reading →
  • Gordon Duff Prize 2018

    The Gordon Duff Prize is an annual competition for an essay on any one of the following subjects: bibliography, palaeography, typography, book-binding, book-illustration, or the science of books and manuscripts and the arts relating thereto.

    The Prize, which will be of the value of £500, is open to all members of the University.

    To enter, candidates must submit the proposed subjects of their essays to Dr Jill Whitelock, Head of Special Collections, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, CB3 9DR (jw330@cam.ac.uk)  so as to reach her not later than the last day of the Michaelmas Term, i.e. 19 December 2017. Candidates will be informed whether their proposed subjects are approved by the Library Syndicate after its meeting in 6 February 2018.

    If the proposed subject is approved, essays, which must not exceed 10,000 words in length, must be submitted by the last day of Lent Term, 25 March 2018.

    For further information see http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/about-library/prizes-and-fellowships/gordon-duff-prize.

    Image caption: Mirror of the world [Westminster: William Caxton, 1481, after 12 August], Inc.2.J.1.1[3494]


  • New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics Online URL change

    The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics Online has moved from its old URL

    http://www.dictionaryofeconomics.com/dictionary

    to the SpringerLink platform at this new URL

    http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=https://link.springer.com/openurl?genre=book&isbn=978-0-333-78676-5

    The Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z has been updated.  The knowledgebase supporting iDiscover has also been updated and this change will be reflected in the (final) MARC record update of 6 December 2017.

    The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics consists of 3,057 articles written by leading figures in the field including Nobel prize winners,  and is the definitive scholarly reference work for a new generation of economists.



  • Oxford Music Online and Oxford Art Online platform changes

    Oxford University Press advises that on 7 December 2017 the location of articles and pages in the Oxford Music Online and Oxford Art Online will change.  OUP expect the “majority” of articles to re-direct.

    We don’t know what the new URLs for the articles will be before the 27 November, so OUP advise that “pages within the site will need to be updated after the launch”.  You should update any bookmarks you may  have to articles when the new URLs are discoverable after 27 November.

    The URLs for the platforms will remain the same:

    http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://www.oxfordartonline.com/

    http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com/

     

    Complimentary titles with Grove Art Online will no longer be available on the Oxford Art Online site.  Instead, these titles will be discoverable through cross-searching on Oxford Art Online.  A user clicking on one of the search results for these titles, will be taken to Oxford Reference to view the content.  The Oxford Reference links to these titles are here:

    Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms

    Encylopedia of Aesthetics

    Oxford Companion to Western Art

     

    Similarly, complimentary titles with Oxford Music Online will no longer be available on the Oxford Music Online site.  Instead, these titles will be discoverable through cross-searching on Oxford Music Online.  A user clicking on one of the search results for these titles, will be taken to Oxford Reference to view the content.  The Oxford Reference links to these titles are here:

    Oxford Dictionary of Music

    Oxford Companion to Music

    The exception is Encyclopedia of Popular Music, which will no longer be available via Oxford Music Online and will only be accessible via Oxford Reference, here:

    http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195313734.001.0001/acref-9780195313734?rskey=53AcO9&result=1

     

    The Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z and iDiscover records will be updated over the course of the next two to three weeks.

     

    Note on presence of playable Sibelius examples

    Grove Music Online used to offer playable musical examples supported by the Scorch browser plugin, which (as of March 2016) was no longer supported by all Internet browsers. In light of this, OUP has temporarily converted the playable examples to static images. The new Grove Music Online site retains the static images. OUP appreciates that playable musical examples have been a valued resource on Grove Music Online, and apologize that this functionality is currently not available: “Our editors and technical teams have begun work to identify and implement a suitable replacement for the Scorch plugin that supports the scholarly needs of the Grove Music Online community and will be sustainable as we continue to build our playable example library in the years ahead. This is currently a rapidly evolving area of web technology, and we appreciate your patience”.

     

    If you have any questions please write to ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Thank you.



  • American National Biography Online platform change

    Oxford University Press advise that on 27 November 2017 the location of articles and pages in the American National Biography Online will change.  OUP expect the “majority” of articles to re-direct.

    Unfortunately we don’t know what the new URLs for the articles will be before the 27 November, so OUP advise that “pages within the site will need to be updated after the launch”.

     

    The URL for the platform will remain the same as now,

    http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://www.anb.org/articles/index.html

    If you have any questions please write to ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Thank you.

     



  • Berliner Philharmoniker Digital Concert Hall trial

    The University of Cambridge has trial access to the Berliner Philharmoniker Digital Concert Hall. 

    Access to the Concert Hall is via this URL:

    https://www.digitalconcerthall.com

    A pop-up window will appear which prompts you to register with your email address and password or to log in with an existing account. After registering / logging in, you can view all concerts, films and interviews in the Digital Concert Hall free of charge on all supported devices from the network of your institution or from home.

    The trial access continues until 30 November 2017.

    Please send your thoughts and feedback on this trial to Anna Pensaert: email: amljp2@cam.ac.uk

    Each season, around 40 concerts are broadcasted live and they can also be viewed at a later date in the concert archive.  The archive already contains hundreds of recordings with all the great artists of classical music. There are also fascinating documentaries and bonus films.

    Das Bild zeigt den Innenraum der Hamburger Hauptkirche St. Michaelis (Michel), Author: Je-str

    Interior of St. Michael’s Church, Hamburg, where Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach’s cantata Heilig Wq 217 – which forms the introduction to the concert of Brahms’ German Requiem in the Digital Concert Hall – was first performed.  “This ʻHeiligʼ,” according to the composer, “is an attempt … to attract far greater attention and sensation through ordinary harmonic progressions than any anguished chromaticism is able to achieve. It is my swan song …, and should serve to ensure that after my death I am not too soon forgotten.”–Digital Concert Hall programme notes.



  • The Digital Recovery of a Lost Page of Codex Bezae

    A guest post by Elijah Hixson.  Elijah is currently finishing his PhD on 6th-century Greek manuscripts of the Gospels at the University of Edinburgh.

    Among the treasures of the Cambridge University Library is the famous Codex Bezae (MS Nn.2.41, Gregory-Aland D05).  A Greek-Latin diglot of the four Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles and a fragment of the Third Epistle of John, Codex Bezae dates to c. 400 CE and is among the most studied manuscripts of the New Testament in existence.  It was cited at the Council of Trent in 1546, and in 1550 Robert Estienne cited variant readings in Codex Bezae in the margins of his Greek New Testament.  In 1562, it came into the possession of the Calvinist theologian Theodore Beza, who gave it to the University of Cambridge in 1581.  To this day, Codex Bezae continues to be the subject of books, articles, conferences and doctoral theses.

    Opening leaves of the Acts of the Apostles, Greek text on the left and Latin text on the right – MS Nn.2.41, ff. 415v-416r

    Codex Bezae is known for its remarkable text.  It preserves the Gospels in the so-called ‘Western’ order: Matthew, John, Luke and Mark.  It is the oldest known manuscript to include the pericope adulterae (John 7:53–8:12).  Most significantly, however, is the Bezan text of the Acts of the Apostles.  The text of Acts in Codex Bezae is around 8% longer than the standard text due to words and phrases added throughout to smooth out the narrative.  Like so many ancient manuscripts, it has lost a few pages in its long life.  It is to those missing pages that we turn – and to one in particular.

    We must first take a brief detour to another manuscript of the New Testament, Gregory-Aland 33 (Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, gr. 14).  Codex gr. 14 was nicknamed ‘Queen of the Cursives’, but ‘Her Majesty’ did not earn her title from any regal appearance.  This manuscript has an important text, but at places it is nearly impossible to read due to damage from having been stored in damp conditions in the past.  One scholar was able to read it, though in an unusual manner.  Samuel P. Tregelles noted that although there was no visible writing where there should have been, the text was not completely lost.  It was just in the wrong place: on the opposite page, backwards.  The damp storage conditions had caused the pages to stick together.  When they were pulled apart, the ink often adhered to the facing page.[1]

    Location of several missing leaves in the Acts of the Apostles, with evidence of water damage and adhered letters on the recto – MS Nn.2.41, ff. 446v-455r

    The same phenomenon occurs in Codex Bezae.  In at least one place, a few letters from the Greek side have stuck – backwards – to the facing page of Latin text.  What is significant, however, is that in this one place, the Greek page was subsequently lost. We have no record of what this page looked like or what Greek text it contained. Thanks to the wonderful images of Codex Bezae on the Cambridge University Digital Library, it is possible to work with the images in photo-editing software to recover some of the lost text.  I give the following example from one line on folio 455r.

    The first step is to notice the anomalies in a line—the traces of ink that do not look like they are part of the original Latin writing. Some ink is offset an a colour different than what we would expect. Notice in particular the triangular shape in the middle of the above image.

    The second step is to reverse the image; it is easier than reading traces of Greek letters backwards. With the image reversed, we can see that the triangular shape in the middle is really the remnant of an α. Slowly the letters on either side become clear.

    The final step is to reconstruct the text digitally. Based on the Latin text and a knowledge of what is in the text of most Greek manuscripts at this point, we can try out some possibilities and see which letters fit with the traces of ink that are there. Using actual examples of Greek writing from the scribe’s own hand elsewhere in Codex Bezae, we can fill in the text.

    (The very first gif to appear on the Special Collections blog!)

    What we find is that the reconstruction works: the expected text fits the traces of ink that are there: θαλαϲϲα[ν] (thalassa[n]; ‘sea’).  The final letter was beyond the edge of the water damage, so none of the ink from that letter transferred to this page.  This line is from Acts 10:6 and it refers to Simon the tanner, whose house was by the sea.

    It was fascinating to be able to read parts of this lost page for the first time in several hundred years. I am especially thankful to the staff of Cambridge University Library Special Collections and Conservation departments for allowing me to see the manuscript in person in February 2017 to verify some of the traces of ink.

    A published version is forthcoming in the journal New Testament Studies in 2018; a link will be provided here in due course.

     

    [1] S. P. Tregelles, The Greek New Testament: Edited from Ancient Authorities, with Their Various Readings in Full, Part VII: Prolegomena, and Addenda and Corrigenda, ed. by F.J.A. Hort and A.W. Streane (London: S. Bagster & Sons, 1879), p. xxiv.


  • New ebooks – October 2017

    Here is a selection of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during October. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

    Click on the cover image to access the title via our authenticated links.