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  • Soncino-Gesellschaft

    80 years ago in the night of November 9-10, 1938 Nazi Germany unleashed terror on its Jewish citizens. The ‘Reichskristallnacht’ marked the beginning of the Nazis’ implementation of their ‘final solution’, the annihilation of the Jewish population and with it … Continue reading →
    Timestamp: 16 November 2018 - 12:12pm
  • Rose Book Collecting Prize 2019

    Entries are open for the 2019 Rose Book-Collecting Prize, which offers students the chance to win £500 by writing and talking about their own book collections.

    The Prize was endowed in 2006 and is believed to be the first of its kind offered by any European university. As well as the £500 prize money, the winner will be offered 10 years’ free membership of the Friends of Cambridge University Library. The prize will be awarded in the Easter Term. It has been funded by Professor James Marrow and Dr Emily Rose in honour of Dr Rose’s parents, Daniel and Joanna Rose.

    The contest is open to all current undergraduate and graduate students of the University registered for a Cambridge degree. To enter, students should submit a list of their collection together with a short essay, explaining the theme and significance of the collection, by Friday 25 January 2019. Shortlisted candidates will be invited to talk about their collection to a panel of distinguished judges.

    The judges will make their decision based on the intelligence and originality of the collection, its coherence as a collection, as well as the thought, creativity and persistence demonstrated by the collector and the condition of the books. The monetary value of the collections will not be a factor in determining the winning entry—a coherent collection of paperbacks is a perfectly valid entry.

    In 2018, the prize was won by Nikita Makarchev of Magdalene College for his collection of books on 2×2=5: Protests and experiments in Revolution-era Russian poetry. His collection was also highly commended for the ABA national book collecting prize. Nikita will be curating an exhibition in the entrance hall of Cambridge University Library in March 2019 which will showcase some of his collection.

    For full details of the Rose Book-Collecting Prize and how to enter, see http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/about-library/prizes-and-fellowships/rose-book-collecting-prize.


    Timestamp: 16 November 2018 - 9:00am
  • Roberto Gerhard

    Catalan composer Roberto Gerhard (1896-1970) settled in Cambridge in 1940, after the Spanish civil war. Although main recognition of his achievements came perhaps later in his career, he has long been widely acknowledged as a key figure in the development … Continue reading →
    Timestamp: 16 November 2018 - 8:45am
  • Re-classification in the Divinity Library (books on a particular author)

    End of section on Thomas Acquinas, at 10 THQS… , Divinity Library, University of Cambridge

    In the past few years many improvements have been made to the classification (the way the books are ordered on the shelves) of the Divinity Library. The quality of the classification of a Library is important because it can increase the usefulness of a collection for the reader, allowing them to discover books related to a subject they are studying which they may not otherwise have found.

    The old class-marking system of the Divinity Library had the virtue of simplicity, but as the collection has grown it led to several disadvantages, one of the most significant of which was not shelving books on a particular author together.

    So, for example, books on Aquinas would be classified by the surname of their author/editor, thus dispersing them throughout the sequence. For a student studying a specific author, it is very helpful to bring all of the books on an author together in one place so that they can see the majority of what the Library holds at a glance, and potentially find relevant books which they were unaware of.

    To this end, books on a particular author are now classified by that author and only after this by the author/editor of the book itself. So for example, the following book:

    The Oxford handbook of Aquinas / edited by Brian Davies and Eleonore Stump

    would formerly have the classmark ’10 DAV’, but is now classified as ’10 THQS DAV 4′ (‘THQS’ being the four letter code given to Aquinas – authors are now given unique four letter codes where necessary to ensure that books on and by them file together and not with those on or by authors with similar names).

    If you have any questions, or would like more information, please contact the Divinity Library (library@divinity.cam.ac.uk).

    MP.

     


    Timestamp: 14 November 2018 - 3:18pm
  • Trial access – Aluka

    Trial access has been arranged to Aluka : World Heritage Sites (Africa) and Aluka : Struggles for FreedoM (South Africa) from 12th November to 12th December 2018 on the JSTOR platform.

    Please send us your feedback about these resources.

    Aluka : World Heritage Sites

    World Heritage Sites: Africa is made up of more than 86,000 objects in 30 sub-collections. The resource links visual, contextual, and spatial documentation of African heritage sites.

    The materials in World Heritage Sites: Africa serve researchers in African studies, anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art history, Diaspora studies, folklore and literature, geography, and history, as well as those focused on geomatics, advanced visual and spatial technologies, historic preservation, and urban planning. The collection is also a tool for museums, libraries, NGOs, and government organizations that manage or oversee cultural heritage sites, as well as for experts and professionals engaged in the conservation and management of such sites.

    Spatial and contextual data

    Spatial data includes 3D models and plans of structures and surrounding landscapes, geographic information systems (GIS), ground plans, façade views of structures, stereo and digital images, panorama images, and digital video.

    The contextual data and materials include scholarly research, books, historical and recent documents, maps, site plans or diagrams, and photographs and slides.

    Aluka : Struggles for Freedom

    The liberation of Southern Africa and the dismantling of the Apartheid regime was one of the major political developments of the 20th century, with far-reaching consequences for people throughout Africa and around the globe. Struggles for Freedom: Southern Africa focuses on the complex and varied liberation struggles in the region, with an emphasis on Botswana, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe.

    Struggles for Freedom: Southern Africa brings together materials from various archives and libraries throughout the world documenting colonial rule, dispersion of exiles, international intervention, and the worldwide networks that supported successive generations of resistance within the region.

    The resource consists of 76 different collections of more than 20,000 objects and 190,000 pages of documents and images, including periodicals, nationalist publications, records of colonial government commissions, local newspaper reports, personal papers, correspondence, UN documents, out-of-print and other particularly relevant books, pamphlets, speeches, and interviews with those who participated in the struggles.


    Timestamp: 12 November 2018 - 3:18pm
  • Trial access – Music Online: Classical Scores Library

    From 12th November until 12th December members of the University of Cambridge can access the Alexander Street Press Music Online : Classical Scores Library

    Music Online: Classical Scores Library is the largest and most authoritative resource of in-copyright scores to support teaching and research in classical music. This multivolume series contains more than 53,000 titles and 1.3 million printable pages of the most important scores in classical music, ranging from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. More than 4,600 composers are included, from traditionally studied composers such as Mozart and Tchaikovsky to contemporary artists including Kaija Saariaho, Peter Maxwell-Davies, and John Tavener.

    Alexander Street Press describe the resource as…

    “…a series of four volumes with a mission to provide a reliable and authoritative source for scores of the classical canon, as well as a resource for the discovery of lesser-known contemporary works. The collections encompass all major classical musical genres and time periods from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. With full, study, piano, and vocal scores, this comprehensive collection will enhance the study of music history, performance, composition and theory for a variety of scholars.”

    Our trial access is to all four volumes of the library.

    The resource can be browsed by title, genre, instruments, people, publishers, time periods and composers.

    For information on getting the most out of the library during the trial please take a look at the LibGuide.

    Send us your feedback about this trial.

     

     


    Timestamp: 12 November 2018 - 2:19pm
  • Trial access: Literature Online (LION) Premium Collection

    Originally posted on ejournals@cambridge:
    Trial access to the new Literature Online (LION) Premium Collection is now available until 1 December 2018 via this link: https://trials.proquest.com/access?token=QOVBR26P0RPE631YAL58 ? Please send your feedback on this trial to ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Thank you. ? A…
    Timestamp: 12 November 2018 - 10:24am
  • Siegfried Sassoon on Armistice Day

    The scenes of jubilation in Britain at the end of the First World War are familiar from often-reproduced images. Photographs taken in London and other cities show crowded streets, overloaded motor vehicles, and scores of excited faces. Not everyone was in a mood to celebrate on that day, however, and those with the closest experience of the fighting were often more subdued and reflective than many in the civilian population.

    Siegfried Sassoon. MS Add.7973/S57a

    The poet Siegfried Sassoon was one such, and an account of how he spent Armistice Day can be found in his journal. The University Library’s pre-eminent holdings of Sassoon manuscripts include a full set of his surviving wartime journals, running from the time he arrived on the Western Front as a Second Lieutenant in November 1915, through his service at the Battles of the Somme (1916) and Arras (1917), to the last days of the War. The journals have been fully digitised in the Sassoon Journals collection of the Cambridge Digital Library, and here, reproduced by permission of the Trustees of G. T. Sassoon Deceased, is a transcript of his entry for 11 November 1918:

    Monday 11th. I was walking in the water meadows by the river below Cuddesdon this morning – a quiet grey day. A jolly peal of bells was ringing from the village church, & the villagers were hanging little flags out of the windows of their thatched houses – the war is ended. It is impossible to realize. Oxford had much flag waving also – & signs of demonstration.

    I got to London about 6.30. & found masses of people in streets & congested Tubes – all waving flags & making fools of themselves, – an outburst of mob patriotism. It was a wretched wet night, & very mild.

    [Richmond] Temple took me to dine with some people called Bigham (in Cheyne Walk) – B. is a conventional civil servant – a Commissioner of Scotland Yard,* – small & meagre & prim. His wife is a would-be Colefax. Enid Bagnold was there, & a Mrs Helen Campbell – an American journalist, & a young Navarro, musical & effeminate. Also a man called Hugh Godley,† & a (Cosmo Gordon Lennox) man. They were all very excited & silly, & shallow. I hated them & their good dinner, & their sympathy with the mob flag waving. ‡Bigham & Godley argued that it is a very fine sight to see the people behaving in Bank Holiday style, & they got very angry with T. & self when we opposed their view.

    It is a loathesome ending to the loathesome tragedy of the last 4 years.

    † afterwards Lord Kilbracken

    ‡      ‘’      Lord Mersey

    * This was wrong. (vide Who’s Who).

     

    [The ‘footnotes’ are Sassoon’s own, and were added much later: Hugh Godley (1877–1950), a barrister, did not succeed his father as Lord Kilbracken until 1932. Charles Clive Bigham (1872–1956), far from being a ‘conventional civil servant’, had had a varied military and diplomatic career at home and abroad, including spells as an intelligence officer and as aide-de-camp to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, and had served as Provost Marshal at the Dardanelles expedition; he succeeded to his father’s viscountcy in 1929. Sassoon was comparing his wife, Mary, to the society hostess Sibyl, Lady Colefax (1874–1950). Enid Bagnold (1889–1981) was already celebrated as the author of A Diary without Dates (1918), an account of her wartime work as a hospital nurse in London, and went on to be a novelist and playwright. Richmond Temple, who had served in the Royal Flying Corps, knew Sassoon through their mutual friend, the journalist and gallery owner Robert Ross, who had died unexpectedly the previous month.]


    Timestamp: 11 November 2018 - 8:00am